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Friday, October 25
 

7:45am PDT

Breakfast
Friday October 25, 2019 7:45am - 8:45am PDT
Waap Haawk, House of Birch (Cafeteria)

8:45am PDT

Welcome & Opening Remarks
Friday October 25, 2019 8:45am - 9:15am PDT
Waap Galts’ap, Longhouse

9:15am PDT

Keynote - Risky Teaching: How our students’ success depends on our willingness to fail
As educators, we are often socialized into a system that fears failure and seeks to avoid uncertainty. Yet, the world we live in and the one our students will inherit is full of complex, unscripted problems where the answers are not immediately known and the consequences matter. How might we best prepare students for such a future? What teaching and learning methodologies should be in our toolbox? What new knowledge, skills, and aptitudes must we acquire? In this address, we will explore the transformative power and potential of risky teaching— in its various forms and methodologies. Using examples from across the K-16 educational sector, we will consider how we can take more risks as teachers and, as a consequence, experience learning transformation.

Speakers
avatar for Dr. Jay Roberts

Dr. Jay Roberts

Associate Vice President of Academic Affairs and Professor of Education, Earlham College


Friday October 25, 2019 9:15am - 10:15am PDT
Waap Galts’ap, Longhouse

10:15am PDT

Break
Friday October 25, 2019 10:15am - 10:45am PDT

10:45am PDT

"Game of Teams": Embracing diversity in team based learning
As Post-Secondary institutions continue to embrace more international student populations and commit to classrooms that embrace experiential learning, teamwork has emerged as an opportunity and a challenge.  

This experiential workshop will involve playing the “Game of Teams”, promoting dialogue about what key elements are required for effective team-based learning. We will explore the question of how educators can effectively implement key elements into their classroom to support learning though teamwork.

Participants will leave with: 
  • Clarity around design elements for powerful team-based learning
  • A toolbox of team-based learning resources


Speakers
avatar for Trish Dyck

Trish Dyck

Manager of Team Coaching, Team Coach, Royal Roads University
Manager of Team Coaching at Royal Roads University (RRU). Team Coaching is a co-curricular support service at RRU offering team skill development, co-creation with instructors around team design/assessment, live team coaching, and mediation. I invite conversations on Team Based Learning... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for John Dyck

John Dyck

Instructor, Coast Mountain College
I am instructor at Coast Mountain College, currently studying for an MA at Royal Roads University in interdisciplinary studies. I am interested in transforming my teaching practice by implementing experiential place-based learning. Since 2017 I have used Team-Based Learning Methodology... Read More →



Friday October 25, 2019 10:45am - 11:30am PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1139

10:45am PDT

From Routine to Adaptive: Transforming Learning
The nature of life and living has completely transformed. Global over-population, mass migration, climate change, technological advances, and a colossal sum of human knowledge are issues that have re-defined the skills we need as human beings. Here in British Columbia, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s Calls to Action, and the new BC K-12 Curriculum, have inspired an open-ness to re-examining established learning cultures. As such, educators today are taking a long look at teaching and learning practices, evaluating which to retain, which to augment, which to discard, and which to invent in order to best serve the goal of cultivating educated citizens for the 21st century. 
Adaptive expertise theory is a critical ingredient for all levels of education. It describes the cultural, contextual, and character attributes of learning tasks that contribute to generating innovative solutions for complex problems in any discipline. Adaptive expertise is not simply about being more adaptable; it shifts perspectives from problem solving to problem setting in reflective and reflexive ways that embrace multiple perspectives and concerns.

Participants in this workshop will discuss adaptive expertise theory and collaboratively apply it to concrete learning tasks from K-16 levels to deepen their understanding of the qualities needed for learning tasks that reflect the world graduates are expected to thrive within. Participants will leave this session with criteria for designing learning tasks for any level, in any context, to help foster innovative thinking within their students.



Friday October 25, 2019 10:45am - 11:30am PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1145

10:45am PDT

They Snooze, They Lose: Wake Up Your Students with Active Engagement in the Classroom
When you’re in the field or shop, students seem alive and energized. Why does that sometimes seem to change when it comes to learning in a classroom environment? Come gain some new tools for engaging your students from Trades Instructors.  

Speakers
WR

Waylon Roy

Coast Mountain College

Speakers

Friday October 25, 2019 10:45am - 11:30am PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1113

10:45am PDT

Rocks in the River - Interaction in Education
Willian Pinar (2019) explored the roots of the term “curriculum” and found the concept of “currere” – to run a course, to take a journey. He posed curriculum as the lived experiences of our learners. This idea challenges us to consider what curriculum looks like as a journey.

For many learners, this journey is akin to encountering a wide, fast running river; the learners’ goal – doing real things in the real world – lies uphill, upstream on the far side of the river. Our job, as educators, is to throw rocks in the river – learning activities and the interactions they embody – that provide pathways to their goals.

This interactive session engages educators in identifying and examining the learning activities they use. Participants then explore the essence of these activities: what are learners “doing” in these activities, who and what do they interact with, and – most importantly – what is the likely outcome of each activity? How far in the river is each activity likely to take learners? Next, participants consider how these activities can be leveraged through different technologies and learning modalities (e.g., mobile, online, face-to-face, workplace). The activities are “mapped” then analyzed through the metaphor of throwing rocks in the river.

This metaphor sets up a variety of intriguing potential discussions: matching learning activities with desired learning outcomes; blending educational technologies and practices to create effective pathways; or examining strengths and challenges of common learning “pathways” – e.g., distributed/hybrid learning, online, face-to-face, etc.; analyzing “bottom up,” “top down,” and “flipped” approaches.


Speakers
avatar for Ron Bowles

Ron Bowles

Director, Academic Affairs, Justice Institute of British Columbia
Dr. Ron Bowles is Director, Academic Affairs at Justice Institute of British Columbia. Ron worked as a paramedic in BC's interior and Vancouver before coming to JIBC as an instructor in 1992. He has since held roles in administration, leading a curriculum development group, and heading... Read More →

Friday October 25, 2019 10:45am - 11:30am PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1119

11:30am PDT

Transition Time
Friday October 25, 2019 11:30am - 11:45am PDT

11:45am PDT

Designing Educational Materials for Diverse Learners
In this presentation, we will talk about how to design digital educational materials so they are more inclusive and accessible for all students. This will include an overview of the technical considerations of digital accessibility. For example, alt tags, headings, table markup, and link text are vital for ensuring that students with print disabilities can access and navigate through the resource. But we will also talk about accessibility considerations that go beyond the technical aspects. For example, what does an accessible resource look like for a student with no personal computer? What about for a student who spends long hours on transit every day? Or a student with a learning disability who struggles with math? Ultimately, students can be very different from each other, and what may work for one student may not work for another. But by designing for those differences, we can create educational materials that are more useful, powerful, and accessible to all.

Speakers
avatar for Josie Gray

Josie Gray

Advisor, Inclusive Design and OER Collections, BCcampus
Josie is the Coordinator of Collection Quality at BCcampus. She manages the B.C. Open Textbook Collection and provides training and support for B.C. faculty publishing open textbooks in Pressbooks. Josie has been learning about and teaching accessibility best practices in OER for... Read More →

Friday October 25, 2019 11:45am - 12:30pm PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1139

11:45am PDT

Getting it Right: A Review of UFV Launch
In 2018-19, the University of the Fraser Valley initiated a program for new faculty members - UFV Launch.

The purpose of this two-course program was to provide newly hired full-time faculty members with the foundation of educational support, resources, and a learning network as they moved into their new role at UFV.

The program was grounded in the pedagogy of the First Peoples’ Principles of Learning and was delivered in a variety of modes – in the classroom, hybrid and online.

This session will review the data gathered in pre and post-tests, participant feedback and instructor observations that helped determine the success of the program and its impact.

Speakers
avatar for Maureen Wideman

Maureen Wideman

Associate Vice President, Teaching and Learning, University of the Fraser Valley
Maureen has spent more than 25 years in the teaching and learning field beginning as an instructional designer, faculty member, director and now AVP. She approaches faculty development as a student success initiative and maintains the learner-centred approach in all she does. Her... Read More →

Friday October 25, 2019 11:45am - 12:30pm PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1145

11:45am PDT

Transformation through reflection: Facilitating reflective practice in the classroom
John Dewey (1910) defines critical reflection as “the active, persistent and careful consideration of any belief or supposed form of knowledge in light of the grounds that support it and the further conclusions to which it tends” (p. 6).  It can result in a transformational experience for students where they start to think beyond the content to connections with themselves, with each other, the real world and beyond but learning only if the reflection leads to personal change (Mezirow, 2000).  Hinett (2002) notes that “reflection is a way of thinking about learning and helping individual learners to understand what, how, and why they learn. It is about developing the capacity to make judgments and evaluating where learning might take you.”  Studies show that reflection increases knowledge retention, builds stronger connections across curricular areas and promotes critical thinking (Jacoby, 2010; D'Erizans, R., & Bibbo, T., 2015).  Reflection is a “powerful process of making meaning” (Jacoby, 2010).  It is individual, experiential and transformative.

While the literature acknowledges the importance of reflection in deep and transformative learning, facilitating reflective practice can be a challenge for even the most experienced instructor. Through an interactive workshop session, tools for facilitating reflective practice will be explored.

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
•    Explain the importance of reflective practice for transformative learning;
•    Develop strategies for using reflective practice in your classroom;
•    Facilitative a reflective activity.


Speakers
avatar for Claire Hay

Claire Hay

Associate Professor of Geography, University of the Fraser Valley
avatar for Michelle Johnson

Michelle Johnson

Educational Developer, University of the Fraser Valley
Michelle Johnson is an Educational Developer and part of the Teaching and Learning team at the University of the Fraser Valley. She has a background in Graphic Design and customer service. She is currently working towards two goals: a Masters in Learning and Technology and the implementation... Read More →


Friday October 25, 2019 11:45am - 12:30pm PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1113

11:45am PDT

Moving towards a decolonized business curriculum
Our research collaborative is engaged in understanding what decolonizing the curriculum can look like,
especially as it applies to business education. In this 45-minute session, you will hear about what our
literature review of decolonizing the curriculum has found and how we see it applying to business
education, based on our personal experience as instructors, specialists in curriculum, and program
managers. We will then engage in talking circles to further explore the topic of decolonizing education
as it may apply in participants’ learning and teaching contexts.


Speakers
LW

Laurie Waye

Acting VP Academic, Students, and International, Coast Mountain College

Speakers

Friday October 25, 2019 11:45am - 12:30pm PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1119

12:30pm PDT

BCTLC Members Only Lunch
Speakers
avatar for Catharine Dishke

Catharine Dishke

Thompson Rivers University


Friday October 25, 2019 12:30pm - 1:45pm PDT
Waap Sginiis, House of Jackpine: President’s Boardroom

12:30pm PDT

Lunch with Drone Demo
Friday October 25, 2019 12:30pm - 1:45pm PDT
Waap Haawk, House of Birch (Cafeteria)

1:45pm PDT

The Mind the Gap Program: Creating Collaborative Secondary and Post-Secondary School Projects that Support the Inclusion of all Learners
This presentation will provide information about the Mind the Gap program at Thompson Rivers University with specific emphasis on inclusion of all students.  The Mind the Gap program brings together K -12 teachers with TRU faculty members to provide engaging opportunities for secondary school students to extend their learning as they transition to post-secondary school.  Their collaborative projects included bringing the secondary students to TRU to experience post-secondary classes and events.  Specific projects that support the inclusion of all students are:  The Employment Skills and Training Program, School District 73/TRU Pride Program, Girls Exploring Trades and Technology, and Connecting English Language Learners.

The transition from secondary to post-secondary school is critical for academic success (Roderick, Nagaoka, & Coca, 2009). Essential to this transition is the communication between the instructors of the two sectors. School-university partnerships which are deliberately designed to have mutuality in roles and relationships, are oriented towards working together, and have a shared conceptual understanding are more likely to be sustainable and lead to increased outcomes for students (Walsh & Backe, 2013).

Key discussion topics will address bridging the divide between educational institutions and instructors to provide enhanced support and knowledge sharing, with ultimate goal of enhancing the educational experience of all learners.


Speakers
avatar for Catharine Dishke

Catharine Dishke

Thompson Rivers University
SL

Susan Lidster

Thompson Rivers University

Friday October 25, 2019 1:45pm - 2:30pm PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1139

1:45pm PDT

Adventurous Path to Learning: Paddles and Pedagogy
“A ship is safe in the harbour, but that is not what ships are for.” William G.T. Shedd, quoted in Roberts 2016.

Come hear about the professional development experiences of faculty from Coast Mountain College as they were led on an experiential learning transformation journey. They left safe harbours behind, with those what they knew about traditional teaching, and travelled on an adventurous path to learning in a course called ‘Paddles and Pedagogy’. Led by the inspirational Dean of Learning Transformation, Dr. Carrie Nolan, 10 instructors embarked on a six-day sea kayak trip through the Mexican Baja. Days focused around how to design, facilitate, integrate, and assess lessons in experiential place-based learning. Evenings were filled with new friendships, sharing of stories and best practices, and reflecting on the lessons in an unplugged environment.

Faculty members will discuss narratives around their journey, sharing how they approached learning before the adventure. They will acknowledge their trepidation with this proposed learning style heading into strange lands. The faculty will lead lessons they learned throughout the course and share the learning that happened outside of the course. A year and a half after returning, they will tell the stories of rolling out these exciting and experiential lessons in class and the reaction from the students and graduates. They will also speak about the community of educators that has been created and how the learning hasn’t ended after that life-changing week.

Speakers
avatar for Kimberly McIntyre

Kimberly McIntyre

Faculty/Coordinator, Coast Mountain College

Speakers
EV

Evan van Dyk

Instructor, Coast Mountain College


Friday October 25, 2019 1:45pm - 2:30pm PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1145

1:45pm PDT

Bacon grease and Buoy Clinging: Adventures in affording students the dignity of their own suffering and challenge.
Explore perspectives of teacher as guide. Participants will be invited to consider the role of suffering and challenge in learning and growth, how it connects to the human experience and how, as educators, we can guide our students into and through experiences that help them learn to “long for the immensity of the sea.”


Friday October 25, 2019 1:45pm - 2:30pm PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1113

1:45pm PDT

Bridging Experiences with Indigenous Communities: Experiential and Place-Based Learning in NW BC
Our presentation explores a community-based, experiential education program from multiple viewpoints within the community and institution partners. The Certificate in Cultural and Natural Resources Assessment (CCNRA) is a for-credit, seven-month program funded through the Aboriginal Community-based Training Program administered by the Ministry of Advanced Education, Skills and Training. The CCNRA provides students with the knowledge and skills to work as field technicians and conduct biophysical and cultural inventories. Graduates of the program have found employment with Indigenous and non-Indigenous owned environmental services companies in environmental monitoring and assessments primarily related to liquefied natural gas project development. The employment rate among graduates is over 90% and includes students from the Kitselas, Haisla, Gitga’at, and Métis Nations. The provision of university credits to successful students creates a potential pathway to future education and career growth.  

The impetus behind the development of the program was driven largely by the community partner (Kitselas Nation) but the institutional partner (Professional and Continuing Studies at Royal Roads University) had primary responsibility for program design and implementation.

This presentation examines the CCNRA program from multiple perspectives through a variety of questions including:
  • How did the experience of program collaboration differ between the partners? 
  • What are the successful markers of an experiential, place-based in-community educational program?
  • How was Indigenous culture reflected in the program? 
  • To what degree can the program be considered to have reached the level of a genuine partnership? 
  • Looking ahead, how can community and institutional partners set the stage for student-focused, impactful programs in community? 


Speakers
TB

Tim Brigham

Royal Roads University

Friday October 25, 2019 1:45pm - 2:30pm PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1119

2:30pm PDT

Transition Time
Friday October 25, 2019 2:30pm - 2:45pm PDT

2:45pm PDT

2:45pm PDT

Overcoming Barriers: High Expectation Projects that Every Student Can Complete
Place-based projects, in-depth inquiry, and building things can connect academic learning to student interests. But many students face too many barriers to get engaged or to follow through on the kinds of projects that bring out this kind of learning. Barriers related to attendance, academic skill level, self-regulation, self efficacy, student behaviour, or trauma can result in students, who are capable of in-depth, high standard, and deep thinking projects, ending up in a cycle of seat work, worksheets, shallow analysis, and incompletion of research papers, inquiry projects, or place-based learning experiences. Given the educational and developmental value of in-depth inquiry projects for all students, this session addresses the following question: How can intermediate, middle school, and high school teachers practically design units and projects that not only engage all students through in-depth learning experiences, but that also ensure that every student actually completes their project according to a manageable timeline (for both student and teacher alike) and in reference to the high expectations that all students deserve to be held to. The session presents practical strategies to engage all students through project-based and high expectation learning given the reality that many teachers face: High class size, unbalanced classroom composition, multiple barriers for students, wide ranges in academic levels (including literacy and numeracy), and limited supports for students. These strategies can help manage workload for teachers, open up project-based learning to more students, and ensure that students actually complete their project in time to reflect and build on their own learning. (has taught intermediate, middle school, and high school, including at GidGalang Kuuyas Naay Secondary in Haida Gwaii and Prince Rupert Middle School in Prince Rupert. He helped organize an Outdoor Learning Club at GKNS and has taken students out to the land, shore, and sea for learning experiences that have included skinning deer, climbing trees, kayaking, harvesting food, and learning from Elders and other First Nations knowledge keepers.)

Speakers
avatar for Tom Kertes

Tom Kertes

Public School Teacher, Prince Rupert Middle School
I am a Grade 7 and Drama teacher at Prince Rupert Middle School.

Friday October 25, 2019 2:45pm - 3:30pm PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1145

2:45pm PDT

Designing for Experiential Learning - Learner Experiences, Designer Insights
Justice Institute of British Columbia’s (JIBC) efforts towards experiential learning are to create meaningful learning opportunities for all students and provide an opportunity to learn skills from practitioners in the field. Experiential education emphasizes the importance of hands-on learning experiences in authentic contexts of practice; Research discusses numerous benefits for students engaged in integrated experiential learning, informing well regarded theoretical explanations of learning such as situated learning and cognitive apprenticeships. More recent developments have expanded to incorporate the idea of “integrated experiential education” (Fenton and Gallant, 2016) whereby “integration” is explicit about (a) the interdisciplinary nature of coursework which emphasizes relationships among subjects, rather than independent courses that focus on a single subject area (Anderson, 2013), and (b) meaningful student engagement in the surrounding community as a part of the learning process. However, it is important to consider how these experiences and efforts are perceived by our students. We want to find out:
  • students’ perceptions engaging in integrated experiential learning
  • aspects of integrated experiential learning that are most valuable/transformative for them and the  challenges.
  • how faculty and practitioners they engage with maximize/minimize these
Presenters will share the design of an interdisciplinary course and the experiences of students, faculty and practitioners (mentors) working and learning together to develop a multidisciplinary solutions to real-world problems.

Anderson, D. (2013). Overarching goals, values, and assumptions of integrated curriculum design. SCHOLE: A Journal of Leisure Studies And Recreation Education, 28(1), 1 - 10.
Fenton, Lara and Gallant, Karen (2016) "Integrated Experiential Education: Definitions and a Conceptual Model," The Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning: Vol. 7: Iss. 2, Article 7. Available at: http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/cjsotl_rcacea/vol7/iss2/7

Speakers
avatar for Florence Daddey

Florence Daddey

Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation, Justice Institute of BC
Florence is a Program Manager and Instructor and works for the Centre for Teaching, Learning and Innovation (CTLI) at the Justice Institute of BC. In her role as an instructional designer she collaborates with program areas and divisions as they develop and redesign their courses... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Dave Smulders

Dave Smulders

Instructional Designer, Justice Institute of BC


Friday October 25, 2019 2:45pm - 3:30pm PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1113

2:45pm PDT

Women’s Studies 101: How I turned South Asian men into Euro-Canadian Suffragettes
In the space of one academic year, my Women’s Studies classroom became dominantly South Asian and male instead of Canadian and female. This presentation describes how I adapted my curriculum to best meet the needs of students ranging from second year social work students, to students who had never heard of Women’s Studies and had been in Canada for three weeks.

I will share stories and student learning outcomes from the Fall Introduction to Women’s Studies course, and describe the range of experiential learning activities, from role plays, field trips, cooking assignments, panel presentations and more, to achieve student learning for men and women from a variety of backgrounds in a Winter course on the history of women in Canada. I will discuss how the various activities I employed built on one another and utilized the learning spaces in and around the Coast Mountain campus at Terrace.

Please join me in an interactive workshop that invites all of us to consider the learning WE are experiencing when we use these methods in educational settings that are both indigenizing and internationalizing.

Participants will leave this session ready to use writing prompts, role plays and other experiential activities to enhance textbook based curriculum and foster cross-cultural understanding.

Speakers
DV

Dina von Hahn

Coast Mountain College

Friday October 25, 2019 2:45pm - 3:30pm PDT
Waap Amgam, House of Cedar: Rm 1119

3:30pm PDT

Transition Time
Friday October 25, 2019 3:30pm - 3:45pm PDT

3:45pm PDT

Teaching Bites
Katie Bunting
Research on the effects of access to and immersion in nature for K-12 students has identified multiple benefits for student health, well-being, and academic performance. There is less research exploring the effects of learning in nature for post-secondary students, with a particular paucity of research on graduate students’ experiences. Purpose: This study sought to understand how participating in a class held in a forested area and Japanese garden affected master of occupational therapy (MOT) students’ learning. The research questions were: (1) how did this outdoor class affect students’ self-regulation, academic buoyancy, and sense of connection to nature, campus, and their peers?; and (2) what were students’ experiences of learning outdoors? Methods: For research question one, 16 MOT students completed pretest & post test measures. Paired t-tests were used for analysis. A descriptive qualitative approach was used to answer research question two. Nine MOT students completed face-to-face semi-structured interviews and inductive thematic analysis was used. Findings: (1) There was a significant increase in measures of state mindfulness (p< 0.001) and academic buoyancy (p = 0.046). A significant decrease in perceptions of peer cooperation (p = 0.045) was found, which may be due to a ceiling effect, as pretest scores were high. (2) Themes related to self-regulation, connection, and the perceived value of learning outdoors emerged. Conclusions: For graduate level students, a natural environment can provide regulating sensory experiences, facilitate student interactions, allows for mental breaks, and offers students a space to consider new ways of understanding class content.

Karen McMurray
Cooperation, teamwork, pushing boundaries and playing within a discipline. Escape rooms as a way of showing what you know through adventure and intrigue.

Kenneth Shaw
Ocean Sediments

Jonathan Stone
Making statistics real, impactful, and fun. Students are tasked with finding open source datasets that will follow them throughout the course, culminating in an analytical paper. Datasets are chosen by the students and range from fish density in particular streams, the $$ value of different college majors, climate change data, to the deaths faced by Avengers characters in movies VS comic books.

Trish Dyck
Key elements, new directions, and recent research on team-based learning

Amber Brady
Professionalism and experiential learning: a look at how we are incorporating professional expectations into our learning in our Labour Relations course with a hybrid schedule of traditional weekly classes combined with an intensive bargaining simulation weekend.


Speakers
avatar for Trish Dyck

Trish Dyck

Manager of Team Coaching, Team Coach, Royal Roads University
Manager of Team Coaching at Royal Roads University (RRU). Team Coaching is a co-curricular support service at RRU offering team skill development, co-creation with instructors around team design/assessment, live team coaching, and mediation. I invite conversations on Team Based Learning... Read More →
JS

Jonathan Stone

Learning Assistance Specialist, Coast Mountain College
AB

Amber Brady

Business Instructor, Coast Mountain College
KS

Kenneth Shaw

Coast Mountain
KB

Katie Bunting

University of British Columbia
avatar for Karen McMurray

Karen McMurray

Faculty, Coast Mountain College
Curiosities are open education resources and their impacts, transforming economics education for the betterment of society, provoking care in community and post secondary governance.


Friday October 25, 2019 3:45pm - 4:15pm PDT
Waap Galts’ap, Longhouse

4:15pm PDT

Closing Remarks
Friday October 25, 2019 4:15pm - 4:30pm PDT
Waap Galts’ap, Longhouse